Evaluation of acquisition and storage of food under the Ghana school feeding programme in the Wa and Cape Coast cities

  • Kate Bigson Mail Department of Home Economics Education, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana. AND Department of Catering, Hotel and Institutional Management, Wa Polytechnic, Wa, Ghana.
  • Edward Ken Essuman Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.
  • Gifty Serwaa Otoo Department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Cape Coast, Ghana.
  • John Nsor-Atindana Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.
Keywords:
Farm gate, Open market, Storage facilities, School feeding program, Procurement

Abstract

This research was designed to evaluate how foodstuffs are acquired and stored prior to meal preparation under the Ghana School Feeding program in Wa and Cape Coast schools. A cross-sectional and descriptive survey research designs were used in the study. A purposive and simple random sampling technique was employed in selecting 120 participants computed with Graph pad prism version 16, statistical software. Information was obtained using questionnaire, observation and unstructured interview instruments. Data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science software version 22 and results represent in tables and charts. Findings revealed that most schools did not have food storage places. This situation may force kitchen staff to keep the food ingredients in their homes and bring them when the need be. Kitchens were mostly shed and firewood was mostly used as cooking fuel. It was observed that some of the caterers bought some food ingredients from hawkers who found their ways to the school compounds. Almost all the kitchen staff (97.3% for Wa and 100.0% for Cape Coast) buy from the open market and not the farm gate. This has resulted in food insecurity in some of the regions. Owing to the findings, it was recommended that government should enact policies for all caterers to buy directly from the farm gate at cheaper prices; designated and well-built kitchens, as well as dining rooms, be provided for schools.
Published
2019-12-31
How to Cite
1.
Bigson K, Essuman E, Otoo G, Nsor-Atindana J. Evaluation of acquisition and storage of food under the Ghana school feeding programme in the Wa and Cape Coast cities. J Food Safe & Hyg. 5(1):24-29.
Section
Original Article(s)