Assessment of total protein and soy protein contents in some heated meat products in Tehran, Iran

  • Masoomeh Fekri Division of Food Safety and Hygiene, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND Food and Drug Control Reference Laboratories Center, Department of Food Animal Origin, Food and Drug Organization, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran
  • Gholamreza Jahed Khaniki Mail Division of Food Safety and Hygiene, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mohaddeseh Pirhadi Division of Food Safety and Hygiene, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mahdieh Abbasi Food and Drug Control Reference Laboratories Center, Department of Food Animal Origin, Food and Drug Organization, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran
Keywords:
Total protein, soy protein, heated meat products, quality control

Abstract

Heated meat products are emulsion which have various nutrition materials such as meat as an animal protein and soya as a plant protein. The nutritional value of meat proteins is very high than soya protein but the meat is more expensive than soya which the producers substitute the meat with soya. This study was assessed the soy protein and the total protein contents in some heated meat products collected from food stores in Tehran city of Iran. Twenty samples of heated meat products with 40%, 55% and 70% of meat were randomly collected from food stores. The heated meat products samples were transferred to the food analysis lab. The total protein was determined by the macro Kjeldahl method after sample preparation and homogenization. Also, the soy protein content in samples was measured by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results showed that 4 samples of heated meat products had less total protein content than the standard limit and 16 samples were in accordance with Iranian national standard. Soy protein content in 3 from 8 samples of heated meat products with 40% meat was higher than the standard limit and the others placed in the standard limit (approximate with 4% soy protein). Also, Soy protein content in 6 from 8 samples of heated meat products with 55% meat was higher than the standard limit and only 2 samples were in accordance with the standard limit. All samples of heated meat products with 70% meat set in a standard limit. It was concluded that some heated meat products do not correspond with the Iranian national standard range. The food quality control lab requires doing attention and sensation for correct formulation according to national standard measures.

References

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Published
2020-06-19
How to Cite
1.
Fekri M, Jahed Khaniki G, Pirhadi M, Abbasi M. Assessment of total protein and soy protein contents in some heated meat products in Tehran, Iran. J Food Safe & Hyg. 5(2):60-64.
Section
Original Article(s)